Recent Submissions

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Open Access
Business Education University Curriculum and Students’ Entrepreneurial Skills Empowerment in Lagos State, Nigeria
(The University of Zambia, 2022-10-27) Falobi, O.V.; Ononiwu, B.E.
This study assessed the concept of entrepreneurship development of business education undergraduates in Lagos State. A survey research design was used for this study. The population comprised of 565 business education undergraduates in public universities in Lagos State, Nigeria while a sample size of 160 were used for the study. Mean and standard deviation were used to answer the research questions, while t–test was used to test the hypotheses. The t-test comparison showed that the difference in mean ratings on the influence of business education undergraduate curriculum on promotion of human resources management skill among male and female respondents in Lagos State was not statistically significant. Based on the findings of the study, the researchers recommended among others that the curriculum planners should ensure that business education curriculum content is relevant to the skills required of industries because of the relevance of the programme in providing the needed manpower in industries.
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Open Access
Arrowhead of Nigerian Pentecostalism: The Redeemed Christian Church of God, 1952- 2004
(Pneuma: Journal of the Society of Pentecostal Studies, 2007) Adeboye, O.
This is a historical study of the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG), an indigenous and fan-growing Penseoocal church in Nigeria. The recent explosion in the church is presented here as a response to both local and external stimuli. The ingenuity of the church leadership is further reflected in the way it appropriates crucial moments from its collective past as a means of keeping the establishment mobilised. On the whole, the RCCG presents an interesting ambivalence. On one hand, it tries to distill a distinctive religious ethos, while on the other hand its the different nuances in Nigerian Pentecostaliam. The implication of this situation on the internal stability of the church is further probed in this study.
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Open Access
Salami Agbaje: The Life and Times of an Indigenous Entrepreneur in Colonial Nigeria
(AAU: African Studies Review, 2004) Adeboye, O.
The significance of the colonial period and its effects on Africans has generated heat controversies among scholars. On one hand is the view that the colonial period was just an ‘episode’ in the continuous flow of African history, while on the other is the conviction that the period produced such cataclysms and fundamental dislocations that long-standing socio-political and economic structures were permanently impaired. A middle-of-the-road assessment has tended to incorporate elements from these two extremes emphasizing the complex nature of colonial enterprise. According to this last approach, Africans absorbed the attendant challenges demonstrating their resilience and ingenuity in all areas of life. At the same time, they also experienced important transformations occasioned by the colonial encounter with local variables determining the intensity or otherwise of those developments.
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Open Access
Dispensing Spiritual Capital: Faith-Based Responses to the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Nigeria
(Faculty of Art Monograph Series, University of Lagos, 2007-12) Adeboye, O.
The Nigerian HIV/AIDS situation has been generating considerable concern within several sectors of the society lately. With the number of infected people estimated at almost four million, Nigeria has the third largest number of HIV/AIDS infections in the whole world (after India and South Africa). While government has adopted various strategies to battle the epidemic, it has also repeatedly called for support from the faith-based community, among other groups and stakeholders. It is the response of the Christian section of the Nigerian faith community to this call that is the concern of this paper. The paradigm of ‘spiritual capital’ is used here to capture the uniquely faith-based nature of the spiritual resource that underlies the positive response emanating from the faith community. But not all faith groups have positive responses. The mould of religious dogma and legalism made several groups to remain unsympathetic to the cause of those infected with the virus. The interventions of groups that show concern are in three main areas, namely, prevention campaign, provision of care and support, and the mitigation of the socio-political and economic impact of the epidemic. This study used three faith-based organizations as its case studies: the Catholic Church, Hope Worldwide Nigeria, and the Redeemed AIDS Program Action Committee (RAPAC); and covers the period from 1986 to 2005. A major finding of this study is that Christian intervention in the Nigerian AIDS crisis, though welcome, is presently neither deep-rooted nor widespread. Theological rigidity remains an ever-present impediment in the way of effective Christian intervention. The study therefore calls, among other things, for a revision of certain theologies along lines that favour the weak, the sick and the suffering. After-all, spiritual capital is a grace to which FBOs lay claim, and this should be generously dispensed in favour of those who need it.
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Open Access
Toyin Falola and Yoruba Historiography
(Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2010) Adeboye, O.
This chapter analyses Falola’s contributions to Yoruba historiography. The emphasis here is not really to review all his publications on Yoruba history (and these are quite numerous) but to identify specifically his major contributions to the wider terrain of Yoruba historiography. The term ‘Yoruba historiography’ as used here incorporates the craft (techniques and methodology) of writing Yoruba history; trends in Yoruba historical writing (which include other scholars’ interpretations of the Yoruba past); and major issues and themes of Yoruba history. It is important to add here that the canons of Yoruba historiography are not necessarily different from those of say, African historiography where philosophical issues such as objectivity, explanation and nature of knowledge are concerned. General issues that revolve round the creation of knowledge and other epistemological matters are basically the same. What varies are the particular themes and topics pursued and the methodologies and sources that are tailored to suit them.